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The US Government National Research Council Formed a subcommittee in the early 1970's to study the nutritional requirements of cats and dogs. the National Research Council reports made use of the hundreds of research studies from veterinary medical universities, independent laboratories and the best animal clinics world wide.  Every five years revisions are made to the report and in 1985 a number of multi breed studies led this committee to proclaim that no two breeds had the same nutritional requirement for any one nutrient.  The went further to same many if not most disease and illness were cause by the lack of correct dietary planning for each breed. 

IF YOU DO NOT SEE YOUR BREED IN THE GUIDE OR IN THE ROTATION OF PICTURES CONTACT US AND WE WILL SEND YOU THE INFO. TO ASK A QUESTION , SCHEDULE A CONSULTATION, ORDER FOOD OR A DIY FORMULATION/RECIPE:

Mastering The Art of Breed Specific Diets!

Let’s see, he has a long nose, short and crooked legs, long coarse hair, medium-to-long long ears, all black in color…maybe a Labrador/Poodle mix? Where did the long coarse hair come into play from, maybe a terrier? The options often times are endless.

 

Science Has Proven No Two Breeds Have The Same Nutritional Requirements For Any One Nutrient. To truly meet your pets nutritional needs you must first learn what the nutrient requirements of this breed are, consider their unique health history and discover which organic whole ancestral foods should be used to satisfy these needs.  There are essential health and wellness advantages in knowing the breed or mixture of breeds of your dog. Certain breeds are more prone to health risks and knowing your dog’s genetic background may possibly help you to watch for or screen out these risks.

 

Mastering the Art of Breed Specific Nutrition

                                    

There have been several major studies conducted regarding the different nutritional needs of various canine breeds starting as far back as the late 1960s.  Most of these reports have gone widely ignored by the pet food industry and manufacturers. In 2008 a few manufacturers started producing breed specific formulations. These made me start to wonder what science might these companies have used to design their different formulations.

 

 The US Government National Research Council formed a subcommittee in the early 1970s to study the nutritional requirements of dogs. This subcommittee published their report “Minimum Nutrient Requirements of Dogs for Growth and Maintenance" in 1974.  There were two more revisions; one in 1980 and again in 1985. Both expanded revisions included additional tests on nutrients and added more breeds.  The 1985 revision made use of a number of multi-breed research studies that led the committee to proclaim that different breeds of dogs have different nutritional requirements due to where and how the specific breeds evolved.

 

The National Research Council's report made use of the hundreds of research studies from veterinary medicine Universities, dog food companies, and independent laboratories.  Many of these studies gave a report to individual nutrients found to be essential in the canine diet, i.e.; vitamin A, calcium, copper, etc.  With each research study that used two or more breeds, it was shown that there were nutritional differences between each breed. 

 

In fact, not one research study cited showed any two breeds to have the same nutritional requirements for anyone nutrient!

 

Samples of specific research confirming breed specific nutritional differences in dogs:

 

1. Specific testing showed that food energy requirements of Yorkshire Terriers are different from those of a Pomeranians per Kilogram of body weight.

                                                                                   

2. Testing on the Golden Retriever showed that it required a higher amount of the essential amino acid Methionine than a Labrador per Kilogram of body weight.

3. Testing on the Irish Setter showed a different requirement for zinc than the amount required by an English Setter per Kilogram of body weight.

 

4. Testing to establish the requirements for vitamin A showed that the Poodle puppy, German Shepherd puppy, and Labrador puppy all had different reactions to the same dosage of this one nutrient.

 

5. Testing for vitamin D requirements showed that the Collie and the Great Dane both need from nine to ten times as much as the Fox Terrier per Kilogram of body weight.

 

 Every few years the Board Members of the National Research Council compile the research data and then review all the specific tests.  After this review, they recommend the minimum amounts of each nutrient for commercial dog food within the United States.  The recommended nutrient amounts are the quantities determined by the committee to sustain life at a safe level and balance for any or all breeds of dog.  These recommended amounts are called the "Minimum Nutrient Requirements of Dogs for Growth and Maintenance (amounts per Kilogram of body weight per day).      

 

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW FOR YOUR FREE BREED SPECIFIC GUIDE: